What’s Next 2016

Week in Review: Legalising Uber and Grab the easy part, what of Airbnb?
Uber and Grab will be legal services in Malaysia but that’s just the easy part. What about Airbnb, wonders Karamjit Singh.
What’s Next 2016: Brick-and-mortar world will always be around, says Vincent Tan
Confident that brick-and-mortar companies will always be around, ‘old economy’ tycoon Vincent Tan explains why he feels so, bolstering his view with examples from Amazon and Alibaba.
Week in Review: Go-Jek’s US$550mil funding sparks intriguing scenarios
It has been another strong week for the tech ecosystem in SEA, writes Karamjit Singh.
Four key takeaways from What's Next 2016
Karamjit Singh reflects on the key takeaways for him from DNA’s anchor event and ends his article with an interesting observation.
What’s Next 2016: A good VC is polygamous … yeah, you read that right
VCs have to be supportive of their startups as entrepreneurship is a tough and lonely journey, according to a panellist at the What’s Next 2016 conference.
What’s Next 2016: Data, models and asking the right questions
Big data analytics has been touted as the next big thing, but some are still wondering about its effectiveness – an issue that surfaced at a panel discussion on Big Data & Analytics’ Dark Secret, at the second annual What's Next conference organised by DNA.
What’s Next 2016: If it ain’t broke … well, fix it anyway
The saying goes ‘if it ain’t broke, why fix it?’,  but this no longer holds true for traditional businesses, according to a speaker at What’s Next 2016.
What’s Next 2016: Focus on SEA’s basic needs, forget Silicon Valley
Entrepreneurs in South-East Asia should stop looking at Silicon Valley trends and instead focus on fulfilling the basic needs of people in this region, said one of the panellists at Digital News Asia’s What’s Next 2016 conference last week.
Week in Review: Adapting to the new reality of a world going digital
The brick-and-mortar guys definitely took centrestage at DNA’s just concluded What’s Next conference, with Karamjit Singh sharing some early thoughts from the speakers.
What’s Next 2016: Tycoon Vincent Tan on his costly failures
Malaysian tycoon Vincent Tan revealed that most of the new businesses he invested in 2000 for RM200 million (about US$50 million at current rates) have failed.
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