Intel: More emphasis needed on education for girls

  • Impact of an educated girl or woman can be exponential and far-reaching, company says
  • Hosted 200 schoolgirls for documentary screening; shared what Intel is doing in the space
 Intel: More emphasis needed on education for girls
INTEL Corp continued its drive to get more girls and women educated, saying that they could then become powerful catalysts for progress and economic growth.
 
“Over the past few years, Intel has seen overwhelming data showing that one additional year of primary education alone can increase their future wages by 10% to 20%, while an extra year of secondary school adds another 15% to 25%,” said Abdul Rahman Abu Haniffa, corporate affairs director at Intel South-East Asia, citing a Council on Foreign Relations report from 2004.
 
“This research also shows that educated women reinvest much of their income into their families, proving that the impact of an educated girl or woman can be exponential and far-reaching,” he said in a statement issued by Intel.
 
Abdul Rahman was speaking after Intel Malaysia recently hosted 200 students from five schools in Penang and Kulim to celebrate United Nation’s International Day of the Girl.
 
The students were treated to a documentary screening, and attended career and motivational talks.
 
Intel Malaysia software support manager Oh Haw Kuang was among the employees who shared their life stories and professional experience with the students.
 
“My recent work with the Intel Education Service Corps has really opened up my eyes to how so much more work is still needed to ensure children receive the education they need and deserve.
 
“It was a good opportunity to show our students here how lucky they are to have in Malaysia all the opportunities they need to succeed in their education, in comparison with children from other developing countries like Kenya,” he said.
 
Last year, Oh was posted to Kenya for a two-week immersion programme to support the deployment of Intel classmate PCs in local schools there.
 
The Intel Education Service Corps (IESC) works closely with non-governmental organisations (NGOs) in developing countries to deploy technology solutions based on Intel Education Solutions purpose-built platforms.
 
Intel: More emphasis needed on education for girlsAs of 2013, over 10 million Intel- Classmate PCs have been shipped globally. Through IESC teams, over 2,500 teachers and 77,000 students in 18 countries have benefited from the deployment of these devices in their teaching and learning activities.
 
“From solar-powered schools in Zambia to rural orphanages in Vietnam, IESC teams work with NGOs to define education technology solutions that meet their needs and to prepare rigorous plans for deployment, training and long-term sustainability,” said Oh (pic).
 
“For example, Intel and non-profit organisation Orphans Overseas helped preschoolers in Thika, Kenya learn basic literacy and numeracy with customised educational content on Intel-based classmate PCs,” he added.
 
The sharing session was preceded by the screening of Girl Rising, a film about the power of education to change a girl, and the world. The documentary is the result of a partnership between Intel Corp and 10x10, together with distribution partner CNN Films.
 
Meryl Streep, Anne Hathaway, Liam Neeson, Cate Blanchette, Selena Gomez and other A-list actors contributed voice performances to the film, which also features original music from Academy Award winner Rachel Portman, in collaboration with Hans Zimmer.
 
“Intel recognises the major role technology plays as both a bridge and an accelerator in not only improving the quality of education, but also access to education,” Abdul Rahman said.
 
“Every year, Intel and the Intel Foundation invest more than US$100 million in corporate contributions around the world, including education efforts focused on girls and women.
 
“Through programmes such as Intel Teach, the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair, Intel Learn and Intel Easy Steps, Intel is increasing its emphasis on girls and women. When empowered with technology tools, resources and opportunities to learn, the lives of girls are transformed and so are those of everyone they touch,” he added.
 
Related Stories:
 
Intel backs movie on girls’ education, to work on policy issues
 
The reality of Malaysian schools at odds with nation's aspirations
 
Intel gives away half-a-million to schools, NGOs

  
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